Lion

Last week I saw the movie Lion. I’d been dying to see this movie, ever since I learned of it. I waited for it to make its way to the States, as it was playing in other countries first. Recently I learned that it was playing in theaters, and a few friends had offered to go see it with me. To be honest, I would have loved to go see this movie with them, but I really wanted to see it by myself first. I knew there would be ugly crying, and every girl knows what I’m talking about when I say I needed to get the ugly crying out of the way first!

I was absolutely floored by how well this movie was made. It was honest. At times it was brutally honest. It showed the good, the bad, and the ugly parts of India. The good, the bad, and the ugly parts of adoption. The good, the bad, and the ugly parts of a blended family.

I can’t tell you how many times there was ugly crying coming from my seat because I lost count. It was so absolutely refreshing to see another adoptee going through the same emotions I’d been going through since coming to terms with my adoption loss. Dev Patel gave an astounding performance. The awkward responses when asked about adoption (“I’m not really Indian”). The sadness knowing that there was a family of his somewhere out there. The pain of a family torn apart from another adoption gone wrong in the family and being stuck in the middle.

Watching this movie I was overcome with so many emotions, but one of them was jealousy. I was jealous of this man who had actually gotten to experience India before his adoption. He had memories to hold on to. He KNEW he had a family there and had known them, if even for a short time.

I have nothing. No memories, no known family, not even a name.

Knowing that this adoption story had the rare ending of the adoptee finding and meeting his birthfamily fueled this jealousy, and by the end of this movie my happy tears turned to tears of heartache. Oh how I longed for this kind of reunion. Some adoptees like Saroo are lucky enough to receive one. I never will.

A film that can bring about such deep emotions as heartache, anguish, happiness, and relief all at the same time deserves recognition. If you’re a fellow adoptee, I recommend this movie. If you’re not, I would still recommend it. It just might open your eyes.

2 thoughts on “Lion

  1. Thank you for following my blog. I don’t often write about adoption on there – but you might be interested in another story from Thomas Graham of Ipsify . . . http://www.ipsify.com/lion-cub-in-search-of-his-original-pride/
    I think you will identify with much he has to say.
    And I guess you already realise that I wrote of how I came to relinquish my toddler for adoption in my book I Belong to No One, now available in the States https://www.amazon.com/Belong-No-One-Gwen-Wilson/dp/1409164896
    Our stories are quite different, but I would like to let you know that the (Australian) Post Adoption Resource Centre did a publication called The Colour of Difference, in which adoptees from other countries expressed their feelings and challenges. https://www.benevolent.org.au/connect/post–adoption–support/post–adoption–resources Not sure if they post it overseas.

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